GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS APPLICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY

July 22 – 24, 2008, Lee's Summit, Missouri


Summary Report on a Follow-Up Peer Exchange






Volpe Center and DOT logos Prepared for:
Office of Interstate and Border Planning and
Office of Real Estate Services
Federal Highway Administration
U.S. Department of Transportation


Prepared by:
Planning and Policy Analysis Division
John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center
Research and Innovative Technology Administration
U.S. Department of Transportation

Table of Contents

  1. Summary
  2. Background
  3. Presentations and Discussion

WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS

OVERVIEW OF NCHRP PROJECT 8-55 A

STATE DOT ROUNDTABLE

DEMONSTRATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS

Arkansas DOT
California DOT
Federal Aviation Administration
Minnesota DOT
Nevada DOT
Oregon DOT
Wisconsin DOT
Missouri DOT
Washington DOT

  1. Observations and Lessons Learned

Appendix A. Participants List

Appendix B. GIS for ROW Agenda


I. Summary

On July 22–23, 2008, the Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA) Office of Interstate and Border Planning and Office of Real Estate Services sponsored a 1.5– day peer exchange focusing on select state Departments of Transportation (DOTs) applications of geographic information systems (GIS) in the right-of-way (ROW) area. Purposes of the peer exchange, which was a follow-up to a peer exchange held in August 2007 on the same topic1, were to:

Participants at the event, which Missouri DOT hosted at its District 4 Office in Lee's Summit, Missouri, consisted of staff from the Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department (AHTD), California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), FHWA Headquarters, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Minnesota DOT, Missouri DOT, Nevada DOT, Oregon DOT, USDOT Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, Virginia Tech University, Washington DOT, and Wisconsin DOT (See Appendix A for complete list of participants).

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II. Background

As noted in the summary report for FHWA's first peer exchange on GIS in the ROW area, the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970, as amended (the Uniform Act), established the rules, policies and procedures for acquiring real property, or ROW, and the relocation of individuals and businesses affected by federally-funded projects. The law was enacted to guarantee that people whose real property is acquired, or who are compelled to move as a result of projects receiving federal funds, will be treated fairly and equitably and will receive assistance in moving from the property they occupy. The USDOT is designated as the Federal Lead Agency for the Uniform Act — a responsibility that is delegated to FHWA.

Over recent years, as their appreciation and understanding of how geospatial applications might enhance ROW decisions has matured, some state DOTs have begun using GIS to automate their ROW functions. To help encourage the exchange of experiences and knowledge in the burgeoning field, in August 2007 FHWA sponsored a 1.5-day peer exchange focusing on transportation agencies' GIS applications in the ROW area. The Transportation Research Board's (TRB) NCHRP Project 8-55 and 8-55A, which describe the initial steps in automating the information technology (IT) process required for ROW acquisition and management, were also important discussion topics at the peer exchange.

To continue promoting the advancement of transportation agencies' geospatial technology use for ROW purposes, FHWA's Office of Interstate and Border Planning and Office of Real Estate Services sponsored a second peer exchange, following up on the 2007 event. This report provides a summary of the presentations made and conversations held at the 2008 peer exchange. It should serve as a resource for other DOTs and transportation agencies looking to learn more about the implementation of GIS for ROW. The report concludes with a section on the lessons participants stated having learned and recommendations they make for moving forward.

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Presentations and Discussion

Day 1 — Wednesday, July 23, 2008

The peer exchange's first day comprised a discussion of outcomes from the first stage of TRB's NCHRP Project 8-55 and the status of its second phase, Project 8-55A; a roundtable discussion focused on the participating DOTs' GIS for ROW current activities; and, demonstrations of selected applications of GIS for ROW.

Welcome and Introductions

Kathy Facer, FHWA Office of Real Estate Services
Mark Sarmiento, FHWA Office of Interstate and Border Planning

As an introduction, Ms. Facer thanked participants for traveling to the peer exchange and encouraged them to continue providing her with ideas for future peer exchanges or other outlets for sharing experiences among states. Resources are available for FHWA to support activities beyond this exchange. For example, another option for convening counterparts in other states is through video conferencing. FHWA's Office of Real Estate Services has great flexibility in scheduling video conferences. It was suggested that one topic for a video conference be to create an NCHRP proposal or problem statement.

Concurring, Mr. Sarmiento described a number of activities FHWA's Office of Interstate and Border Planning has supported over the last several years that promote GIS implementation and/or knowledge exchange at and among state DOTs. Recently, FHWA has published:

Peer exchange participants were encouraged to visit FHWA's GIS in Transportation website (www.gis.fhwa.dot.gov), which is home to a searchable database of state DOTs' GIS applications and to submit GIS for ROW papers to be considered for the 2009 GIS-T Symposium to be held in Oklahoma City, OK.5

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Overview of NCHRP Project 8-55 A

Kitty Hancock, Virginia Tech University

Building upon her presentation during the 2007 GIS for ROW peer exchange, Ms. Hancock discussed the status and schedule for the NCHRP Project 8-55A Developing a Logical Model for a Geospatial ROW Information Management System, a second phase of NCHRP Project 8-55.6

The purposes of the phase two research, which focuses on the appraisal, acquisition, relocation, and property management aspects of ROW, are to:

The process for completing the research effort will consist of building a logical model, testing the logical model on select state DOTs, and writing executive summaries that describe why a state DOT might consider geospatially enabling a ROW information system and what it would take to do so. The logical model, which is being developed in Uniform Modeling Language, will include sequence diagrams and collaboration diagrams and be a model for how a state DOT could refine ROW business processes. The logical model is expected to be completed by October 2008.

For the case studies, state DOTs will be selected based on the extent to which the ROW system could connect to other systems in the organization, the extent of their GIS development, and the state DOT's willingness to participate. To further examine the logical model for suitability and functionality and to demonstrate that the product is useful for ROW functions, a series of scenario tests are planned. The goals of the tests are to:

Results of the scenario tests will be used to update the logical model and develop guidance for implementing the system, including a discussion of the ramifications, costs and benefits of doing so.

In advance of the scenario tests, the study team conducted a survey of all state DOTs. Twenty-two of 52 responded. According to the responding DOTs:

Results for state DOTs' future plans indicated that:

Comments, Questions, and Answers

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State DOT Roundtable

All Participants
Facilitator: Kathy Facer, FHWA Office of Real Estate Services

All participants were given the opportunity to provide a brief overview of their respective organization's GIS for ROW activities. State DOTs that were on the agenda and scheduled to present more in depth information — Minnesota DOT (Mn/DOT), Missouri DOT (MoDOT), and Nevada DOT (NDOT) — agreed to introduce their activities last during the roundtable discussion. Day one time constraints caused MoDOT and Washington DOT (WSDOT) to give their talks on day two of the peer exchange. For purposes of report organization and clarity, summaries of all presentations, including those given on day two are included in the section below.

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Demonstrations and Presentations

All Participants

Arkansas DOT (Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department)

Robert Fuhler and John Kendrick

The Arkansas DOT reported that it is in the process of developing a ROW-related GIS. Examples of GIS technology applications include:

AHTD's Environmental GIS Section has scanned and georeferenced older maps, including hand-drawn maps for historical locations of land plot information. Currently, the Section is focusing on the methods, incorporation and consolidation of scanned maps into a geospatial database. Ultimately, AHTD would like to offer digitized ROW data for all locations. AHTD is considering developing a land acquisition system that displays geospatial ROW data for all locations as well as project relocation and condemnation phases.

One of the state's primary GIS and ROW-related projects is the County Assessors Mapping Program (CAMP)8, a cooperative partnership between the Arkansas Assessment Coordination Department (AACD), the Arkansas Geographic Information Office (AGIO), and participating counties. CAMP is a two-phased project that focuses on developing geospatially-referenced cadastral mapping for Arkansas. The first phase of the project involves using centroids to upload parcel data, as just under half of the state's 75 counties are covered with centroids (the rest are covered by polygons). The centroids can also be joined with tax records, which help ROW and cost estimates. Ultimately, more information will be added to the parcels via the centroids.

California DOT

Mark Turner

Caltrans' Right of Way Management Information System (ROWMIS), a replacement to its legacy Integrated Right of Way System (IRWS), is a user interface application to the new ROW tabular relational database. Unlike IRWS, which was based on a non-relationship database, ROWMIS was developed to help reduce inefficiencies related to ROW planning and management.

The new application provides ROW management, agents, and staff with a secure centralized database and standard input/output to facilitate planning and management of highway projects and parcel acquisition. It is a web-based java application that was developed entirely in-house with Caltrans programmers and ROW and ROW engineering staff. The primary advantage of ROWMIS over IRWS is that all information stored in ROWMIS is directly accessible by anyone with an access account through Oracle's web based Discoverer application. Discoverer allows a user to query and analyze data, and fields have been established to geospatially-enable data analysis and integration.

The ROWMIS database contains project, parcel and acquisition information and the last page of the ROWMIS Manual contains data field and key information. Currently, there are two ROWMIS applications: the ROWMIS viewer, which is a read-only version, and the ROWMIS manager version. ROWMIS can provide supporting data for cost estimate maps, which depict potential parcel areas and project footprints. The maps superimpose the project footprint to show the potential impacts of projects on various tax parcels.

Caltrans reported that the state legislature has emphasized disposal of excess parcels as a revenue source. To visually identify the impacts of transportation activities on land, Caltrans is now using Google Earth to display surplus properties and permits to enter and construct. Using Google Earth allows maps to display parcels' proximity to highway and geographic features as well as the terrain relief. The maps, which are currently available only internally, facilitate real property retention review, which confirms parcels available for disposal. A Google Maps movie has been added to dynamically visualize ROWMIS data; a narration may accompany this movie if desired. While Caltrans has offered online auction information for the past 15 years, maps could be used to enhance a parcel sales brochure: for example, a public land auction could link to parcel map imagery in its table of contents. Ultimately, Caltrans envisions having a system that allows users to view and query maps in a Google Earth type environment.

To date, ROWMIS has been rolled out to 9 of Caltrans' 12 district offices, with delivery to the remaining 3 districts expected by the end of July 2008. Since its inception, over 200 enhancements to ROWMIS have been made and more than 500 staff members have started to actively use it.

Some challenges to ROWMIS implementation have included:

In the future, Caltrans would like to develop a forms generation capability for ROWMIS, add utilities, railroad, and relinquishment information to the database, and further enhance information regarding condemnation, estimating, structures, and relocation assistance modules. Furthermore, Caltrans would like ROWMIS to automatically update posting tables for direct input into ROW record maps. Another future goal is to incorporate ROWMIS tables and exported data into survey and GIS mapping projects, which would enable potential customers to see the usefulness of GIS/ROWMIS applications.

products, and software required by various offices in the Department. The result of this survey indicated that key data were alignments, ROW mapping, and engineering surveys, and that the mapping priority should include horizontal survey control data. Another finding was that offices would like more training on Google Earth. Using the survey results, Caltrans is creating a roadmap of a strategic path for further ROW mapping development.

Comments, Questions, and Answers

Federal Aviation Administration

Rick Etter

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is developing a ROW document management system that is expected to be completed in 2009. The system will serve approximately 3,400 airports, each of which has aeronautical charts being digitized in GIS format. The system, which has cost $200K to develop, is being funded by FAA under its operations budget.

Smaller airports have fewer parcels to maintain than larger sized airports, which often spend millions of dollars on systems for managing airport operations. Some of the latter, such as in Seattle, utilize enterprise GIS, while others use GIS in conjunction with quality control systems. The goal is to develop systems that are immediately verifiable and to move away from reactive 'coping' strategies to more developed systems that can proactively anticipate needs. FAA is using these airports' lessons learned to facilitate the development of its ROW document management system. The goal of the effort is to improve the way FAA manages certain business processes related to ROW.

Minnesota DOT

Jay Krafthefer and Kevin Leonard

Mn/DOT reported on progress made in developing the Right of Way Electronic Acquisition Land Management System (REALMS), which was initially implemented in 2005 and also described in the 2007 GIS-ROW peer exchange.9

REALMS is a web-based, online, statewide system that allows users to quickly access and search ROW information, visualize and track parcel geometry, and customize and generate ROW reports. To build the system in a time- and cost-effective manner, Mn/DOT purchased a software product used by the Virginia Department of Transportation, the Right-of-Way and Utilities Management System (RUMS), and used VB.NET in conjunction with Oracle to modify RUMS to meet Mn/DOT's business needs. The total cost for developing REALMS will be approximately $2 million. This total cost does not include an estimate of $168K to fund the visualization work and $358K to fund map conversion to a spatially-enabled format. To maintain cost-efficiencies, Mn/DOT is using internal resources as much as possible to develop the system. There are 150 users of REALMS, which is accessible to Mn/DOT staff and consultants. A user group required to enter data into the system.

Initiated in April 2008, REALMS Phase II is now complete. Phase III of REALMS and an associated mapping project will focus on two goals: (1) converting ROW maps into standardized digital parcels to make REALMS spatially-enabled; and (2) building REALMS into a comprehensive work environment for project scoping. Because these two goals are interrelated, Mn/DOT expects that both will need to be accomplished simultaneously. Phase III work completed to this point includes development of several project teams (e.g., an executive team, a steering team of engineers/office directors, a core team of higher level practitioners, a technical team of IT staff, and a business area team) and refinement of high-level requirements and standards for parcel geometries, parcel status, and data entry.

Once fully implemented, Mn/DOT anticipates that REALMS will minimize errors and delays on ROW projects, improve confidence in enterprise parcel data, and facilitate better project decision-making. Furthermore, REALMS is expected to offer significant time- and cost-savings due to its ability to quickly produce and visualize standardized ROW data.

Mn/DOT presented a sample welcome screen for REALMS. To capture and preserve the continuity of institutional knowledge, REALMS has a 'help' feature that provides complete information about individual functions. In addition, REALMS offers a technical help feature. Other elements on the REALMS website include:

Mn/DOT then displayed a sample REALMS mockup screen. Color-coded parcels indicate project status and make it easy to 'trigger' next project phases. REALMS also offers legal descriptions and property appraisal information as well as electronic parcel files.

With progression into Phase III, Mn/DOT's business areas have established several issues for future consideration. For example, it was previously sufficient to track only the presence or absence of parcel complexity indicators such as environmental conditions. A new priority is to more accurately display these conditions (e.g., contaminant sources such as a well) in relationship to a parcel's boundaries. Furthermore, Mn/DOT would like to have the ability to perform quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) on REALMS by displaying, for instance, lack of data for a particular parcel. Mn/DOT anticipates that a QA/QC process may better give better incentive for business areas to address and resolve data errors.

With assistance from a consultant, Mn/DOT developed a business plan in March 2008 to address the need for modernizing ROW mapping services. As part of this plan, a study questionnaire was provided to internal and external stakeholders to assess mapping effort and delivery priorities. Subsequently, a five-phase plan was produced to provide a timeline and structure for enterprise ROW mapping system implementation. Phase 1 involved creating the business plan and is now complete. Phase 2, which is scheduled from July to December 2008, will focus on building pilot ROW digital maps to establish appropriate standards, requirements, and data development methods. Phase 3 will begin in January 2009 and focuses on converting legacy data for inclusion in digital parcels. During this Phase, a priority will be eliminating data conversion backlogs that currently exist. Phase 4 will spatially-enable the digital parcels by linking ROW maps to an ArcGIS server. This latter phase is now being implemented concurrently with REALMS Phase III and is scheduled for completion in January 2009. Finally, Phase 5 will highlight ways to make REALMS a comprehensive project management approach at Mn/DOT.

Challenges

Mn/DOT concluded its presentation by reporting on REALMS' successes to date. According to user feedback, REALMS has been effective in meeting customers' needs. Mn/DOT has been especially responsive to feedback noting aspects of REALMS that need improvement. While such feedback can be negative in nature, it demonstrates that users are accessing the system and trying to use it to facilitate accomplishing their day-to-day work.

Comments, Questions, and Answers

Nevada DOT

Halana Salazar and Eric Warmath

To enhance its ROW management operations, Nevada DOT (NDOT) is partnering with Smart Data Strategies (SDS) to implement the Integrated Right of Way Information Network (IRWIN). The goal of IRWIN is to improve and integrate the information systems used for managing ROW and to provide this information in real-time to state employees. IRWIN, which was developed as a result of a legislative audit, will take advantage of work done by the GIS section to create a historical road network showing most of the system changes over time. This will allow users to perform queries and receive results for a specific place or time. Various documents and contract plans in the EDMS will then be linked with GIS to facilitate work processes. The EDMS portion alone is expected to save hundreds of man hours each year in ROW processes and other divisions needing access to contract plans. The system, which is expected to be completed in March 2009, will:

IRWIN also consists of a series of user interface screens customized for the major ROW area workflows, including:

IRWIN's Electronic Document Management System (EDMS) was built on Documentum ApplicationXtender 5 (AX5) software since the product was already in house and met NDOT's specified system requirements. Other specifications are:

The budget for IRWIN, which has been fixed and expires June 30, 2009, was approximately $5.6M. The project is currently about 3% under budget.

Challenges

Lessons Learned

Comments, Questions, and Answers

Oregon DOT

Mike Stone

In 2007, prior to the first GIS-ROW Peer Exchange, Oregon DOT (ODOT) released a FileNet Enterprise Content Management (ECM) application that allowed for rudimentary searches for ROW content. As part of the implementation of the FileNet ECM system all of ODOT's parcel maps were scanned, georeferenced, and data regarding each parcel (township/range/section at a minimum) was captured and indexed by the placement of centriods.

Since that time, ODOT has worked to develop a GIS front end to the system. Released in June 2008, the enhanced FileNET ECM allows users to zoom in to see various parcel data, including map number, file number, record number, deed date, history of deed sales, explanation of why ODOT purchased the property, and information on the relevant road. ODOT has established a minimum set of data that must be captured before being entered into the system, which is home to over 100,000 files; hundreds of ODOT personnel that had never previously seen ROW files now have direct access to them. A downside has been that urban areas could have over 100 or more pages of data.

The system was developed using funding ($4M) provided as part of a legislative mandate requiring that property records be made freely available. Approximately $3.2 million dollars of the funding were provided for an effort to take ECM to the next level of using automated workflows and file management. The final "look and feel" of the system is not currently known, as the primary focus has been to build a foundation from which the entire agency can work and to which data can be moved.

Future

An effort to map acquisition workflows, defined by ODOT as zero percent scoping to final design, with the parcels the DOT will acquire, has nearly been completed for the system. It is expected that the legal description creation process and the appraisal description process will be automated next, after which relocation, condemnation, acquisition activities will be moved into the system. Eventually, ODOT would like to use the system to make mass acquisition cost estimates based on historical data and prices, or have access to all documents available through a GIS interface that displays the parcel polygon (instead of the current centroids).

In June 2009, ODOT plans to release a web-based e-forms application with extranet capabilities, because the Department has many contractors who need access to and can contribute information themselves. The application is planned to have completely virtual, 'high-fidelity' forms that allow users to add specific pieces of data that others cannot manipulate.

Through all these efforts, ODOT staff members are trying to develop a model of what data should be captured and maintained to maximized cross-division communication.

Wisconsin DOT

Andrew Kottke

Wisconsin DOT's (WisDOT) Bureau of Highway Real Estate has used a Microsoft Access database to help manage ROW functions since the early 1990s. WisDOT is currently researching what alternatives there might be to replace the Access database. The process has been lengthy and has focused on the question of building a new application or replacing the current database with an off-the-shelf application. Whichever route is chosen — a decision is expected by December 2008 and implementation to follow — it is unlikely that the first iteration will be geospatially enabled. WisDOT may take that step in a future phase of the project.

WisDOT does operate various applications related to ROW functions. Some of these are:

Missouri DOT

(Day 2 — Thursday, July 24, 2008)
David Ordway and Jay Whaley

During the 2007 GIS-ROW peer exchange, MoDOT personnel demonstrated the Department's Realty Asset Inventory Management System (RAI), which was placed in production in July 2007. The system is a statewide, computerized, relational database that allows staff to identify all the DOT's realty assets and assists in identifying properties that are no longer needed for highway purposes. It also houses documentation on all sales, leases, and excess properties, as well as references to other realty of interest, such as environmental, cultural, historical, and wetland mitigation sites.

On Day 2 of the 2008 peer exchange, MoDOT discussed the history leading up to RAI development and the application's current status. Emphasizing that it is not finished implementing everything it plans to in regards to the RAI and that the Department is still learning itself, MoDOT also described some of the lessons it had realized in the RAI development process:

Currently, MoDOT continues to refine the RAI, as well as to finalize its Right of Way Parcel Acquisition database. The Department is also developing training in order to educate staff on how to use the applications. In the future, MoDOT expects to refine solid base data, add polygon editing capabilities, and have ROW data management systems and mapping systems work hand-in-hand in real time.

Demonstration

MoDOT concluded its presentation with a demonstration of a TMS viewer mock application that interacts with TMS base data. MoDOT showed how a user could click on the polygon for a given parcel and then be able to view all of the TMS data about that parcel. When creating a parcel polygon, MoDOT will build a shape first then make revisions based on historical data as available and warranting change. Because MoDOT uses Oracle Spatial, staff members are able to build shapes based on X-Y coordinate information acquired in the field.

Comments, Questions, and Answers

Washington DOT

Gerry Gallinger and Jordyn Mitchell
(Day 2 — Thursday, July 24, 2008)

Washington DOT provided updates on the status of its ROW system that was described during the 2007 GIS-ROW peer exchange. Developing the system was a larger undertaking than originally anticipated. The Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) portion is expected to be online soon, while the GIS portion is in development. The system is server-based and is intended to track the progress of individual parcels through the ROW process. When complete, the system will help integrate WSDOT's CAD-based mapping environment with a spatially-enabled parcel level RDBMS. As a result, WSDOT anticipates that it will be able to better manage property acquisitions, financial data, and project/property costs. ROW management and reporting will also be standardized across the state's 39 counties and 15-20 state and federal government agencies located there. The proposed GIS system will be data-driven; changing the data will change the map, eliminating the need to make manual map updates.

To consolidate parcel data collected for the state in the ROW system, WSDOT is investigating using Bentley ProjectWise. Projectwise is an enterprise content and workflow management software suite with several security controls to help teams improve quality, reduce rework, and meet project deadlines. Projectwise also has a module that can translate data between CAD and GIS systems.

Ultimately, the GIS layer in the property management system will 'tie together' parcel information from all scanned maps. The Real Estate Map Information System (REMIS) database, which is nearly complete, tracks these scanned maps and their attribute information. Maps produced before 1980 are not in tabular form; therefore, some of this information is not included in the Parcel RDMBS. Developing REMIS allows capture of this second source of data.

With new funding received for the current biennium, WSDOT has scanned new deeds and is scanning and indexing 40,000 maps for inclusion in the GIS layer of the property management system. A 'hotlink' feature has been proposed for the system that would allow users to access a PDF file of the deed directly from the parcel map. To enable this feature, however, WSDOT would need to re-scan the deeds into PDF files.

WSDOT reported that an ongoing challenge to developing the property management system is finding funding, as the WSDOT budget does not include any discretionary monies for planning projects. Furthermore, it is difficult to maintain funding once it has been provided. Due to difficulty with receiving assured funding for the next biennium, WSDOT has curbed efforts on the ROW system's GIS layer, but intends to apply for future funding to ensure completion of this work. WSDOT is now prioritizing development of a cost-benefit analysis and a proof of concept prototype that would demonstrate to upper-level management the value of the GIS layer; this task was an original impetus for the NCHRP Project 88-5 proposal.

Other challenges include an ongoing need to clarify the difference between ROW plan maps, which include planned property functions, and real estate maps, which include information about what projects were actually completed. Within the department, different users may employ different terms to refer to these maps.

WSDOT then reported on several lessons learned and top tips. First, it is important to clearly define the organization's business needs so as to build an appropriate ROW system. For instance, an "active" project database would include current, dynamic information while an "archive" database will include more static information no longer required for an active project but necessary for parcel inventory and management. Different geospatial data will be needed depending on whether the ROW system is active or archived.) WSDOT also emphasized the importance of creating a data-sharing environment to enable contractors to share data with the agency. Standards must be developed to ensure efficient data-sharing. These include not only attribute standards, but data exchange methods (ftp, disc, etc.), data format, geospatial projection, and frequency. WSDOT intends to develop the archive area first and then apply that environment to the active areas.

Other current ROW-related activities in Washington State include creation of a working group to develop a new statewide parcel framework. The working group is comprised of individuals from 15 state agencies and meets monthly. The goal of the statewide parcel framework working group is to standardize and concentrate parcel data in one location, and determine standards for data-filing, -editing, and -collection. This work includes development of a licensing agreement between 39 counties. To develop this framework, WDOT provided a survey to counties to identify common denominators for managing and maintaining parcel data. The survey then informed a data standardization scheme that could be folded into the statewide framework.

Comments, Questions, and Answers

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IV. Observations and Lessons Learned

All Participants

To conclude the event, participants gave an overview of their general observations made during the peer exchange. Participants also summarized some of the lessons their respective organizations had learned in their efforts to develop, enhance, and maintain ROW applications as well as geospatially enable them where funding and staffing resources have allowed.

Observations

Lessons Learned

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Appendix A. Participants List

Rick Etter
Federal Aviation Administration
Rick.etter@faa.gov
Kathy Facer
FHWA Office of Real Estate Services
785-271-2448 Ext. 224
kathleen.facer@dot.gov
Eric Foster
Missouri DOT
Eric.Foster@modot.mo.gov
Robert Fuhler
Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department
robert.fuhler@arkansashighways.com
Gerry Gallinger
Washington DOT
galling@wsdot.wa.gov
Kitty Hancock
Virginia Tech University
hancockk@vt.edu
Tim Holman
Missouri DOT
Timothy.Holman@modot.mo.gov
John Kendrick
Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department
john.kendrick@arkansashighways.com
Ray Kinard
Missouri DOT
Raymond.Kinard@modot.mo.gov
Andrew Kottke
Wisconsin DOT
Andrew.Kottke@dot.state.wi.us
Jay Krafthefer
Minnesota DOT
Jay.krafthefer@dot.state.mn.us
Thomas Kriete
Missouri DOT
Thomas.Kriete@modot.mo.gov
Kevin Leonard
Minnesota DOT
Kevin.Leonard@dot.state.mn.us
Kelly Lucas
Missouri DOT
Kelly.lucas@modot.mo.gov
Jordyn Mitchell
Washington DOT
mitchejo@wsdot.wa.gov
David Ordway
Missouri DOT
David.ordway@modot.mo.gov
Carson Poe
U.S. DOT Volpe Center
carson.poe@dot.gov
Halana Salazar
Nevada DOT
hsalazar@dot.state.nv.us
Mark Sarmiento
FHWA Office of Interstate and Border Planning
Mark.Sarmiento@dot.gov
Mark Schmidt
Missouri DOT
Mark.Schmidt@modot.mo.gov
Carie Stark
Missouri DOT
carie.stark@modot.mo.gov
Mike Stone
Oregon DOT
Mike.Stone@odot.state.or.us
Mark Turner
Caltrans
Mark_Turner@dot.ca.gov
Eric Warmath
Nevada DOT
ewarmath@dot.state.nv.us
Jay Whaley
Missouri DOT
James.whaley@modot.mo.gov
Walt Wiercinski
Missouri DOT
Walter.Wiercinski@modot.mo.gov
Brad Wise
Missouri DOT
816-622-6500
Bradley.Wise@modot.mo.gov
Lori Wyrick
Missouri DOT
Lori.Wyrick@modot.mo.gov
Alisa Zlotoff
U.S. DOT Volpe Center
Alisa.Zlotoff@dot.gov
 

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Appendix B. GIS for ROW Agenda

GIS for ROW Agenda
July 23-24, 2008
Lee's Summit, Missouri
Tuesday, July 22
Travel Day Coordinate rides from the airport to hotel on the Super Shuttle as flight arrival times allow.
Wednesday, July 23
8:00am Meet in hotel lobby to travel to MoDOT District 4 Conference Room at 600 NE Colbern Rd., Lee's Summit, MO 64064
8:30 – 9:00 Welcome and Introductions
Kathy Facer and Mark Sarmiento, FHWA
9:00 – 10:15 Overview of NCHRP Report
Kitty Hancock, Virginia Tech
10:15 – 10:30 Break
10:30 – 12:00 State DOT Roundtable The 2007 participants should give a quick recap of their projects for new participants. For pre-reading, the link to the 2007 report is www.gis.fhwa.dot.gov/gisrow.asp
12:00 – 1:30 Working Lunch — Networking
1:30 – 4:30 Demonstrations/Presentations
Nevada DOT — Presentation on the current status of GIS/ROW system Minnesota DOT — Presentation on the current status of activities Missouri DOT — Lessons learned
Thursday, July 24
8:00am Meet in hotel lobby to travel to MoDOT District 4
8:30 – 9:15 Day 1 Re-cap and Next Steps
Kitty Hancock, Virginia Tech
9:15 – 10:30 Roundtable Question and Answer
10:30 – 11:00 Peer Exchange Key Points and Wrap-Up
Kathy Facer and Mark Sarmiento, FHWA

Adjourn and Fly Home

Footnotes

1 Summary report from the August 2007 Peer Exchange on Applications of GIS in the ROW Area: www.gis.fhwa.dot.gov/gisrow.asp. (back)

2Visualization Case Studies — A Summary of Three Transportation Applications of Visualization: www.gis.fhwa.dot.gov/documents/visual_toc.htm. (back)

3Business Models for Implementing Geospatial Technologies in Transportation Decision-Making: www.gis.fhwa.dot.gov/bus_model_rpt_3-08/bus_model_rpt.htm. (back)

4Key Practices for Implementing Geospatial Technologies for a Planning and Environment Linkages Approach: www.gis.fhwa.dot.gov/documents/geospatialPEL_rpt.htm . (back)

5 GIS-T Symposium website: www.gis-t.org/. (back)

6Research Results Digest 310: Integrating Geospatial Technologies into the Right-of-Way Data-Management Process, NCHRP Project 8-55: http://onlinepubs.trb.org/onlinepubs/nchrp/nchrp_rrd_310.pdf, Appendices: http://onlinepubs.trb.org/onlinepubs/nchrp/nchrp_w95.pdf. (back)

7To provide feedback on the logical model, see www.nvc.vt.edu/ceege/kitty/NCHRP/default.htm. (back)

8More information about CAMP available at the following link: http://www.gis.state.ar.us/Programs/Programs_current/CAMP_index.htm. (back)

9For more information about REALMS, see Mn/DOT's Office of Land Management website at: www.olmweb.dot.state.mn.us/. (back)